Feminist Legal Studies Anniversary Lecture, Birkbeck, London
Oct
6
6:00pm 6:00pm

Feminist Legal Studies Anniversary Lecture, Birkbeck, London

The lecture is entitled, "The Institutional as Usual: Racism, Sexism and the Politics of Complaint"

In the lecture I will explore how institutions are built from small acts of use. Once we are attuned to an environment, we know what usually happens. This lecture explores how sexism and racism become usual, with specific reference to the use of banter. What happens when we challenge the use of banter as an abuse of power? What follows such challenges teaches us about power; the more you try to transform institutions the more you come up against them. This lecture brings together my current research into the “uses of use” with some early findings from my project on feminist complaint. I will also consider how social justice projects require making usage into a crisis.

Please register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/feminist-legal-studies-25th-anniversary-lecture-sara-ahmed-on-the-institutional-as-usual-sexism-tickets-36747365359

 

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Public Lecture, Barnard, New York
Oct
16
6:00pm 6:00pm

Public Lecture, Barnard, New York

  • Barnard Centre for Research on Women (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Public lecture, The Institutional as Usual: Diversity Work as Data Collection

In this lecture I explore how institutions are built from small acts of use. The institutional becomes usual. What usually happens seems to keep happening without having to be made into official policy and sometimes even despite an official policy. We learn about the institutional (as usual) from those who are trying to transform institutions. Diversity work, the work of trying to transform institutions by opening them up to populations that have hitherto been excluded, generates data on institutions, snap shots of institutional life from the point of view of those trying not to reproduce that life. In this lecture, I bring together data from my study of diversity work in universities first presented in On Being Included (2012) and developed in the middle section of Living a Feminist Life (2017) with my current research into “the uses of use” and complaint. She considers how social justice projects require making usage into a crisis.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-institutional-as-usual-diversity-work-as-data-collection-tickets-36867863773

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Public Lecture, Princeton University
Oct
17
4:30pm 4:30pm

Public Lecture, Princeton University

The Institutional as usual: Diversity Work as Data Collection

In this lecture I explore how institutions are built from small acts of use. The institutional becomes usual. What usually happens seems to keep happening without having to be made into official policy and sometimes even despite an official policy. We learn about the institutional (as usual) from those who are trying to transform institutions. Diversity work, the work of trying to transform institutions by opening them up to populations that have hitherto been excluded, generates data on institutions, snap shots of institutional life from the point of view of those trying not to reproduce that life. In this lecture, I bring together data from my study of diversity work in universities first presented in On Being Included (2012) and developed in the middle section of Living a Feminist Life (2017) with my current research into “the uses of use” and complaint. She considers how social justice projects require making usage into a crisis.

 

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Public Lecture, UNCG, Greensboro
Oct
18
4:00pm 4:00pm

Public Lecture, UNCG, Greensboro

The Institutional as Usual: Sexism, Racism and the Politics of Complaint

This lecture explores how institutions are built from small acts of use. Once we are attuned to an environment, we know what usually happens.  This lecture explores how sexism and racism become usual, with specific reference to uses of banter; ways of using words that point to how spaces become occupied. What happens when you challenge the use of banter as an abuse of power? What follows such challenges teaches us about power; the more you try to transform institutions the more you come up against them. This lecture brings together my current research into the “uses of use” with some early findings from my project on feminist complaint. I consider how social justice projects require making usage into a crisis.

 

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Public Lecture, Washington University in St Louis
Oct
20
3:00pm 3:00pm

Public Lecture, Washington University in St Louis

The Institutional as Usual: Diversity, Utility and the University

In this lecture I will discuss how understanding how and why diversity is 'in use' as a word and concept allows us to explore how universities are shaped by patterns of use that often go unnoticed. I will be drawing on my research into diversity work first discussed in my book, On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life (2012) as well as my current research on the 'uses of use.'

 

 

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Kessler Lecture, CLAGS, CUNY Graduate Centre, New York
Dec
4
6:00pm 6:00pm

Kessler Lecture, CLAGS, CUNY Graduate Centre, New York

This lecture explores the queerness of use as well as uses of queer. The lecture begins with a reflection on the gap between the intended function of an object and how an object is used as a gap with a queer potential. It does not simply affirm that potential, but offers an account of how institutional and sexual cultures are built to enable some uses more than others. Small acts of use are the building block of habit: use can build walls as well as worlds. To bring out the queerness of use requires a world-dismantling effort; to queer use is to make usage into a crisis.

This event is free but please register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-kessler-award-sara-ahmed-on-queer-use-tickets-37391924252

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Conference Feminist Classics Revisited 5: Black British Feminism, Cambridge University
Dec
8
2:00pm 2:00pm

Conference Feminist Classics Revisited 5: Black British Feminism, Cambridge University

Feminist Classics Revisited is an annual series co-convened by Sarah Franklin at Cambridge and Sara Ahmed, an independent scholar. Each year a classic feminist text is the subject of a symposium attended by the author or editor. The series is sponsored by the Cambridge Sociology Department.

This year our chosen text is Heidi Mirza’s edited collection, Black British Feminism, which was published 20 years ago this year. Our symposium will also be a 20 year birthday party for this much read and cited work. At 20 years old, Black British Feminism is the youngest of the feminist books we have discussed thus far. We have chosen it because as a collection it helped to create a collective; to create a space for black women and women of colour within feminism and the academy. Black British Feminism also had a ‘feminist classics’ project; it brought together some of the early ground breaking work by black women and women of colour with newer commissioned pieces. The book thus reached back over 70 years when black Britishfeminism evolved as a conscious political act uniting African and Indian anti-colonial liberation activists in their solidarity against British Imperialism. At the time of its publication, Patricia Hill-Collins the author ofBlack Feminist Thought, remarked on the books, ‘energy and freedom’ which she said was ‘reminiscent of the “coming to voice” of the early African American black feminist movement, embracinga collective “black” but far from uniform voice’.

Many voices can also mean many pathways. It is noteworthy that a number of the contributing writers in the collection have not had conventional academic careers; some wrote from outside the academy and stayed outside; some became academics but left early; others started on an academic pathway and ended up as writers and artists. What do we learn from this plurality of paths and trajectories? With the editor Heidi Mirza and many of the authors of individual papers in attendance, we will be revisiting this collection with the following key questions in mind: how do we survive the whiteness and patriarchal machinery of the academy? How does black feminism allow us to do feminism differently? Why do so many black women and women of colour leave and how can we transform the institutions if we stay? How can our lives outside the academy also be understood as where we do black feminist work? In asking these questions we will also reflect on the genealogies of resistance and agency that shaped our struggle ‘then’ and ‘now’.  This intergenerational conversation will illuminate the roots and directions of a new intersectional movement for racial, gender and social justice that anchors the black feminist project in the new millennium.

 With introduction from Sara Ahmed, contributions from Ann Phoenix, Stella Dadzie and Amrit Wilson (classic reprints), Tracey Reynolds and Bibi Bakare-Yusuf (newly commissioned pieces), commentary from Gail Lewis and Lola Okalosie, reflections from Heidi Mirza and concluding remarks from Avtar Brah.

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Public Lecture, Queer Use, Sexual Culture Series
May
17
6:00pm 6:00pm

Public Lecture, Queer Use, Sexual Culture Series

  • Arts Two Lecture Theatre, Queen Mary, University of London, (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The lecture draws from my current research into “the uses of use.” In this lecture I reflect on the gap between the intended function of an object and how an object is used as a gap with a queer potential. I do not simply affirm that potential, but offer instead an account of how institutional and sexual cultures are built to enable some uses more than others. Small acts of use are the building block of habit: use can build walls as well as worlds.  To bring out the queerness of use requires a world-dismantling effort; to queer use is to make usage into a crisis.

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Public Lecture. Snap: Feminist Moments, Feminist Movements
May
11
7:00pm 7:00pm

Public Lecture. Snap: Feminist Moments, Feminist Movements


Södra Teatern, Stora Scenen May 11, at 19.30

"Snap: the moment she cannot take it anymore. This lecture reflects on snap as a moment with a feminist history. Moments become movements; moments can accumulate, becoming worn threads of connection. Snapping, that moment when the pressure has built up and tipped over, can be the basis of a feminist revolt, a revolt against what we are asked to put up with. The lecture considers feminist movements as snappy movements, suggesting that snap requires a communication system, a way of bringing the violence that is already here to the surface."

The lecture will be followed by a conversation between Sara Ahmed, Anna Adeniji (TRYCK) and Ulrika Dahl (Uppsala University). Afterwards there will be a book launch and signing of Sara Ahmed’s new book in Swedish, Att leva feministiskt at Södran bar. 

This event is for all of us committed to anti-racist feminist analysis and action and is a collaboration between TRYCK, Centre for gender research and Centre for Multidisciplinary Research on Racism at Uppsala University and Tankekraft Förlag. 

*SNAP!*ANALYSIS*CONVERSATIONS* STRUGGLE * DJS * KILLJOYS *TQPOC*FEMINISTS*SNAP! * 

TICKETS CAN BE BOUGHT HERE:
https://secure.tickster.com/Intro.aspx?ERC=UJUH4KYJNZ57300

150 kr/st

TIMES:
18 Södra teatern opens
19.30 Lecture begins, ticket required
21 release party at Södran bar, all invited

For accessibility, contact Södra Teatern:

Södra Teatern & Mosebacke Etablissement
Mosebacke Torg 1 – 3, 116 46 Stockholm
08 – 531 99 490 (ticket office)
info@sodrateatern.com
biljettkassan@sodrateatern.com

 

 

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Public Lecture. Institutional as Usual: Diversity, Utility and the University
May
9
3:30pm 3:30pm

Public Lecture. Institutional as Usual: Diversity, Utility and the University

  • Amsterdam Public Library, Theaterzaal OBA, seventh floor, Oosterdokskade 143, 1011 Amsterdam (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

What does the concept of diversity do in higher education and universities? Feminist author Sara Ahmed, who wrote extensively about racism, sexism, difference, strangerness, and institutions, discusses the concept of diversity in relation to higher education.

Diversity is something one needs to do – at least, if one follows the title of the report of the Diversity Committee at the University of Amsterdam, Let’s do diversity (pdf), published last year. The report, which recommended the University to install a Diversity Unit, received a lot of attention – both positive and negative. Yet, many universities and higher education institutes already have a diversity policy and work with diversity officers. Among them the Vrije Universiteit, Leiden University and Erasmus University.

In universities, the word and concept of diversity is ‘in use’. In this lecture, Sara Ahmed will discuss how understanding how and why diversity is 'in use' as a word and concept allows us to explore how universities are shaped by patterns of use that often go unnoticed. She will be drawing on her research into diversity work first discussed in her book, On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life (2012) as well as her current research on the 'uses of use.' 

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Killjoys@work Panel & Launch Living A Feminist Life
Mar
14
4:00pm 4:00pm

Killjoys@work Panel & Launch Living A Feminist Life

ROOM 1, MILL LANE LECTURE THEATRES

“Living a Feminist Life is about how we connect with and draw upon each other in our shared project of dismantling worlds” -- Professor Sara Ahmed

This panel has been set up to discuss shared feminist and anti-racist projects of dismantling worlds as part of the launch of Sara Ahmed’s new book, Living a Feminist Life. Ahmed uses the figure of the feminist killjoy to describe the work of exposing the violence that is often hidden or normalized as just the ways things are. The killjoy comes up whenever we speak up: she is deemed to cause the violence she exposes. The book is inspired by intersectional feminist activisms, old and new, which develop tactics and strategies for exposing violence, and for sharing the costs of doing this work, from direct action groups such as Sisters Uncut to movements that aim to decolonize the curriculum and to challenge sexual harassment within universities. The panel will be an opportunity to discuss doing feminist work wherever we live and work.

 

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