'"If These Doors Could Talk":  Institutions, Diversity, Complaint,' Public Lecture, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Sep
30
3:30 PM15:30

'"If These Doors Could Talk": Institutions, Diversity, Complaint,' Public Lecture, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

  • Centennial Centre for Interdisciplinary Science, (map)
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If the doors could talk, what would they tell us? This lecture draws interviews with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions or to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. In many accounts of making complaints, doors come up. Complaints are made confidential as soon as they are lodged; complaints happen “behind closed doors.” What can we learn from how doors come up? Doors can be how some are shut out, but also how some are shut in. Doors are not just physical things that swing on hinges (though they are that); they are also mechanisms that enable an opening and a closing.  In dialogue with critical race and critical disability scholarship, the lecture explores how the figure of the open door can be used to create the impression of accessibility, diversity and inclusion, showing how doors can be closed by appearing to be open.

You can register for this event here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/sara-ahmed-if-the-doors-could-talk-diversity-complaint-and-institutions-tickets-69152114837

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Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, University of Winnipeg, Canada
Oct
2
5:00 PM17:00

Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, University of Winnipeg, Canada

This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. It approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores the significance of how complaints happen 'behind closed doors,' and shows how doors are often closed even when they appear to be opened.

Further information here: https://www.facebook.com/events/institute-for-womens-and-gender-studies-iwgs/sara-ahmed-closing-the-door-complaint-as-diversity-work/2566419756735483/

And here: https://events.brandonu.ca/event/public-lecture-by-sara-ahmed-closing-the-door-complaint-as-diversity-work/

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Complaint as a Queer Method, Public Lecture, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Oct
4
6:00 PM18:00

Complaint as a Queer Method, Public Lecture, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

This lecture explores complaint as non-reproductive labour, as the work you have to do not to reproduce an inheritance. The lecture explores the gap between how complaints are represented by organisations (often through flow charts, as being clear, linear and progressive) and how they are experienced by those who make complaints (as being messy and circular). Those who make complaints often know about organisations given what complaints do not bring about. The lecture considers stories of how complaint “come out” as queer stories, reflects on filing cabinets as institutional closets and explores institutional and queer uses of doors. The lecture reflects on complaints in relation to queer use, as the political work of opening up spaces to enable them to be used by those for whom they were not intended.

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Behind Closed Doors: Complaints and Institutional Violence Public Lecture, Crisis Conference, Humanities Research Centre, ANU, Canberra, Australia
Dec
5
5:00 PM17:00

Behind Closed Doors: Complaints and Institutional Violence Public Lecture, Crisis Conference, Humanities Research Centre, ANU, Canberra, Australia

  • Australian Centre on China in the World (map)
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This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as bullying and harassment. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through the system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture considers how complaints are often 'managed' by institutions in order to limit damage or to avoid a crisis. These institutional tactics for managing complaints can be understood as forms of bullying and harassment. The lecture explores the significance of how complaints happen behind closed doors and shows how doors are often closed even when they appear to be opened.

Event information here: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/behind-closed-doors-complaints-and-institutional-violence-tickets-67952436567?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

CFP for conference here: http://hrc.cass.anu.edu.au/events/conference-what-we-talk-about-when-we-talk-about-crisis-social-environmental-institutional

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On Complaint, Public Lecture, Miami University
Feb
6
7:00 PM19:00

On Complaint, Public Lecture, Miami University

This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions or to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. Making a complaint requires that an individual become an institutional mechanic: one has to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of "getting through" that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores the significance of how complaints happen 'behind closed doors,' and shows how doors are often closed even when they appear to be open.

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Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, Brussels
Feb
18
8:00 PM20:00

Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, Brussels

This talk draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. It approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the ordinary and often painstaking labour of trying to transform institutions so they are more accommodating. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The talk explores the significance of how complaints happen “behind closed doors,” and shows how doors are often closed by appearing to be open.

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Public Lecture, Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work,  University College Cork
May
16
5:00 PM17:00

Public Lecture, Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, University College Cork

This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. It approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores the significance of how complaints happen 'behind closed doors,' and shows how doors are often closed even when they appear to be opened.

You can register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeOXJMVcqCQD3MHwGHxHiMgXXq5B64a17JA6o1kiqPRpSXmOw/viewform

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Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, TORCH; Research Centre in the Humanities, University of Oxford
May
9
5:00 PM17:00

Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, TORCH; Research Centre in the Humanities, University of Oxford

This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. It approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores the significance of how complaints happen 'behind closed doors,' and shows how doors are often closed even when they appear to be opened.

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Conference Keynote, Complaint as a Queer Method, Cambridge University
May
3
9:30 AM09:30

Conference Keynote, Complaint as a Queer Method, Cambridge University

Key note for the conference, Queer Art of Feeling, Sensation, Emotion and the Body in Queer Cultures, May 1-3d 2019.

This conference explores the potential of the arts to represent, explore, challenge and create modes of queer lived, felt and embodied experience. Taking ‘feeling’ in all its meanings – touch, hapticity, sensation, emotion, a hunch or gut reaction, as well as tentativeness when ‘feeling one’s way’ – the conference will explore the complex relationships to culture and society that are at stake in queer artworks and queer experience.

https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/19188

Programme here: https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/19188

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Public Lecture, Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Erasmus University, Rotterdam
Mar
14
3:30 PM15:30

Public Lecture, Closing the Door: Complaint as Diversity Work, Erasmus University, Rotterdam

This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as sexual and racial harassment. It approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores the significance of how complaints happen 'behind closed doors,' and shows how doors are often closed even when they appear to be opened. 

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Feb
22
5:00 PM17:00

Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, History Department, Columbia University, NY

What can be learnt about the workings of power from those who challenge power? This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as harassment and bullying. The lecture approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodatedMaking a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores how the experiences that lead to complaint and the experiences of complaint are hard to untangle. It reflects on the role of academic networks and professional intimacies in shaping what happens to complaints and to those who complain. 

Further information available here: https://history.columbia.edu/

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Feb
21
5:00 PM17:00

Gender, Justice and Power Lecture, Lehigh University, Pennsylvania

What can be learnt about the workings of power from those who challenge power? This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as harassment and bullying. The lecture approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores how the experiences that lead to complaint and the experiences of complaint are hard to untangle. It reflects on the role of academic networks and professional intimacies in shaping what happens to complaints and to those who complain.

Information here: https://humanitiesctr.cas2.lehigh.edu/sites/humanitiesctr.cas2.lehigh.edu/files/Sara%20Ahmed.pdf

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Feb
19
7:00 PM19:00

Joan S. Korenman Lecture, Complaint as Diversity Work, University of Maryland, Baltimore Country

What can we learn about the workings of power from those who challenge power? This talk approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. Based on interviews with staff and students who have made complaints related to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as harassment and bullying, the talk explores how the experiences that lead to complaint and the experiences of complaint are hard to untangle. it reflects on the role of academic networks and professional intimacies in shaping what happens to complaints and to those who complain.

Information available here: https://my3.my.umbc.edu/groups/humanitiesscholars/events/65723

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Jan
30
5:00 PM17:00

Public Lecture, Complaint as Diversity Work, Birmingham University, UK

What can be learnt about the workings of power from those who challenge power? This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as harassment and bullying. The lecture approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodatedMaking a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores how the experiences that lead to complaint and the experiences of complaint are hard to untangle. It reflects on the role of academic networks and professional intimacies in shaping what happens to complaints and to those who complain.

Information here: https://blog.bham.ac.uk/cclc/2019/01/09/cclc-january-events-sara-ahmed/

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Public Lecture, Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona, Barcelona
Jan
21
6:30 PM18:30

Public Lecture, Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona, Barcelona

On Complaint

What happens when someone within an institution complaints about bad practice, violation of rights, or abuse of power? In this lecture, the feminist writer Sara Ahmed will explore how we learn about abuses of power from those who make complaints about those abuses. She will consider how making a complaint requires becoming an institutional killjoy: those who complain end up getting in the way of institutional happiness. Making a complaint also requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. The lecture explores how the experiences that lead to complaint and the experiences of complaint are hard to untangle, and it reflects on the role of networks and intimacies in shaping what happens to complaints and to those who complain.

Tickets and information here: http://www.cccb.org/en/activities/file/lecture-by-sara-ahmed/230584

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Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, Gender Studies, Central European University
Dec
6
to Dec 7

Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, Gender Studies, Central European University

  • Central European University (map)
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What can be learn about the workings of power from those who challenge power? This lecture draws on interviews conducted with staff and students who have made complaints within universities that relate to unfair, unjust or unequal working conditions and to abuses of power such as harassment and bullying. The lecture approaches complaint as a form of diversity work: the work some have to do in order to be accommodated. Making a complaint requires becoming an institutional mechanic: you have to work out how to get a complaint through a system. It is because of the difficulty of getting through that complaints often end up being about the system. The lecture explores how the experiences that lead to complaint and the experiences of complaint are hard to untangle. It reflects on the role of academic networks and professional intimacies in shaping what happens to complaints and to those who complain.

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Public Lecture, Queer Use, LGBTQ+@Cam, Cambridge University
Nov
7
5:03 PM17:03

Public Lecture, Queer Use, LGBTQ+@Cam, Cambridge University

  • Mill Lane Lecture Theatres (Room 3) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This lecture explores the queerness of use as well as uses of queer. It begins with a reflection on the gap between the intended function of an object and how an object is used as a gap with a queer potential. The lecture does not simply affirm that potential, but offers an account of how institutional worlds are built to enable some uses (and users) more than others. To bring out the queerness of use thus requires a world-dismantling effort. The lecture reflects on how dismantling is framed as damage and considers the relationship between the creativity of queer use, violence and survival.

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Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, University of Wollongong
Oct
25
4:00 PM16:00

Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, University of Wollongong

The lecture explores how complaint can be understood as a form of diversity work, as what you have to do in order to make institutions more accommodating. Drawing on interviews with staff and students who have made complaints within universities (including complaints about racism, sexism, sexual harassment, and bullying) the lecture addresses the difficulty of making complaints and asks how and why complaints are often blocked. It explores how we learn about power from those who challenge power.

Event is free but you need to register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfmkPzPdM7T1i5qwu3nkrZiKwKkrh2BOjaHdjtSVJ8ooGIutw/viewform

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On Complaint, Public Lecture, Melbourne (Deakin University)
Oct
24
6:15 PM18:15

On Complaint, Public Lecture, Melbourne (Deakin University)

This lecture is organised by the Gender and Sexuality Studies Network at Deakin University.

What does it mean, and what does it cost, to make a complaint? This lecture will draw on oral and written testimonies from those who have made complaints about abuses of power within universities. It rests on a simple premise: that the experience of identifying and challenging abuses of power teaches us about power.

The lecture is free but registration is necessary via the Wheeler Centre: https://www.wheelercentre.com/events/sara-ahmed-on-complaint

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Queer Use, Public Lecture, Melbourne University
Oct
23
6:00 PM18:00

Queer Use, Public Lecture, Melbourne University

  • Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building (map)
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This lecture explores the queerness of use as well as uses of queer. It begins with a reflection on the gap between the intended function of an object and how an object is used as a gap with a queer potential. The lecture does not simply affirm that potential, but offers an account of how institutional worlds are built to enable some uses (and users) more than others. To bring out the queerness of use thus requires a world-dismantling effort. The lecture reflects on how dismantling is framed as damage and considers the relationship between the creativity of queer use, violence and survival.

Information here: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/s/1182/match/wide.aspx?sid=1182&gid=1&pgid=15181&cid=21554&ecid=21554

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Public Lecture, UCL
May
16
6:00 PM18:00

Public Lecture, UCL

Queer Use

This lecture explores the queerness of use as well as uses of queer.  The lecture begins with a reflection on the gap between the intended function of an object and how an object is used as a gap with a queer potential. The lecture does not simply affirm that potential, but offers an account of how institutional worlds are built to enable some uses (and users) more than others. To bring out the queerness of use thus requires a world-dismantling effort. The lecture reflects on how dismantling is framed as damage and considers the relationship between the creativity of queer use, violence and survival.

Event is free but please register here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/queer-use-tickets-43418415650?aff=es2

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Public lecture, Sheffield University
May
10
5:30 PM17:30

Public lecture, Sheffield University

Building Works: On the Uses of Use

Use is a small word with a lot of work to do, a small word with a big history. As Rita Felski describes in her introduction to a special issue of New Literary History on use, the very word is stubby, plain, workmanlike, its monosyllabic bluntness as bare and unadorned as the thing that it names” (2013, 5). This lecture explores different uses of use across a range of intellectual traditions including biology and psychology as well as education. It considers how words and things are shaped by use and shows how worlds are built from small acts of use to enable some uses (and users) more than others.

Please register for the lecture here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/empson-lecture-professor-sara-ahmed-building-works-on-the-uses-of-use-tickets-41308067542

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Public Lecture, Hull University
May
9
5:00 PM17:00

Public Lecture, Hull University

Complaint as Diversity Work, Mary Wollstonecraft Lecture

The lecture explores how complaint can be understood as a form of diversity work, as what you have to do in order to make institutions more accommodating. The lecture draws on written and oral testimonies provided by those who have made complaints within universities including complaints about racism, sexism, sexual harassment and bullying. The lecture addresses the difficulty of making complaints and asks how and why complaints are often blocked. The lecture shows how we learn about power from those who challenge power.

Event details: https://www.hullboxoffice.com/events/mary-wollstonecraft-annual-public-lecture-complaint-feminism-diversity-work-and-institutions

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Panel Discussion, Confrontation? Doing Feminist and Anti-Racist Work in Institutions
May
1
4:00 PM16:00

Panel Discussion, Confrontation? Doing Feminist and Anti-Racist Work in Institutions

How can we confront institutions about their role in perpetuating violence and work to make institutions more open and inclusive spaces? 

In this panel we explore some of the paradoxes and difficulties of doing feminist and anti-racist work within institutions. Even when institutions claim to be committed to equality they are often deeply unequal and hierarchical spaces. A feminist and anti-racist project is to transform the institutions in which we work. The aim of transforming institutions is still however an institutional project: we often have to work through the structures we seek to dismantle. When our political work is resourced or supported by an institution does it become more difficult to confront the institution? Does following procedures or working in house constrain the kinds of work we can do? If for strategic reasons we try to avoid confrontation what else are we avoiding? And how and why are some of us perceived as being confrontational however we are doing the work?

The panel will be a chance to talk from as well as about our experiences of doing feminist and anti-racist work. We will consider who does (and does not) do the work of trying to transform institutions and how these distributions of labour can reproduce inequalities. We will discuss the costs of doing (and not doing) this labour and reflect on how institutions can exhaust us and wear us out. The panel will open up a discussion of how we can confront problems of institutional racism, institutional sexism (including sexual harassment and sexual misconduct) as well as institutional bullying. 

With:
Sara Ahmed, Heidi Mirza, Monica Moreno Figueroa, Lola Olufemi, Tiffany Page and Leila Whitley

Event is free and you just turn up. Information is also posted here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/138694136971975/

This is a launch event for a new feminist counter-institutional initiative FFF

FFF Fighting For Feminism
FFF When feminism is what we stand for

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Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, CRASSH, Cambridge University
Mar
9
5:15 PM17:15

Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, CRASSH, Cambridge University

The lecture explores how complaint can be understood as a form of diversity work, as the work you have to do in order to make institutions more open and accommodating to others. The lecture draws on written and oral testimonies provided by those who have made complaints about racism, sexism, sexual harassment and bullying within universities. The lecture addresses the difficulty of making complaints and asks how and why complaints are blocked. The lecture shows how we learn about the institutional (as usual) from those who are trying to transform institutions.

You can register for the lecture here http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/27586.

 

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Uses of Use: Diversity, Utility and the University, Public Lecture, CRASSH, Cambridge University
Mar
2
5:15 PM17:15

Uses of Use: Diversity, Utility and the University, Public Lecture, CRASSH, Cambridge University

Use is a small word with a lot of work to do, a small word with a big history. As Rita Felski describes in her introduction to a special issue of New Literary History on use, 'the very word is stubby, plain, workmanlike, its monosyllabic bluntness as bare and unadorned as the thing that it names' (2013, 5). This lecture explores different uses of use across a range of intellectual traditions including biology, design and psychology as well as education. It considers the role of utilitarianism in the forming of the modern university (with specific reference to London University, now UCL). One of the aims of the lecture will be to put ordinary use back into the archives of utilitarianism, showing how use in an 'inside job', how use shapes and moulds the university. Drawing on an empirical study of diversity work, first presented in On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life (2012), the lecture explores how and why diversity is 'in use' as a way of demonstrating how universities are occupied, how they are shaped by patterns of use that often remain unnoticed until they are contested.

You can register for the lecture here: http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/27586

 

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Queer Use, Public Lecture, UC Berkeley
Feb
16
4:00 PM16:00

Queer Use, Public Lecture, UC Berkeley

This lecture explores the queerness of use as well as uses of queer. The lecture begins with a reflection on the gap between the intended function of an object and how an object is used as a gap with a queer potential. The lecture does not simply affirm that potential, but offers an account of how institutional worlds are built to enable some uses (and users) more than others. To bring out the queerness of use thus requires a world-dismantling effort. The lecture reflects on how dismantling is framed as damage and considers the relationship between the creativity of queer use, violence and survival.

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Sexual Culture with additional support from UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design, the California College of the Arts and the Queer Cultural Center.

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Complaint: Diversity Work, Feminism and Institutions, Public Lecture, UC Davis
Feb
15
4:00 PM16:00

Complaint: Diversity Work, Feminism and Institutions, Public Lecture, UC Davis

The lecture will draw on interviews with students and staff who have made (or have considered making) complaints about abuses of power within universities. It will show how feminist complaint can be a form of diversity work: as the work you would have to do before some populations can be included within institutions. We learn about the institutional “as usual” from those who are trying to transform institutions. Finally, the lecture will discuss how identifying and challenging abuses of power teaches us about the mechanics of power.

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Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, Centre for the Study of Women, UCLA
Feb
13
3:00 PM15:00

Complaint as Diversity Work, Public Lecture, Centre for the Study of Women, UCLA

The lecture explores how complaint can be understood as a form of diversity work: the work you do to transform an institution, or the work you do when you do not quite inhabit the norm of an institution. If doing diversity work is heard as complaint, making a complaint often requires becoming a diversity worker. This is not to say that those who make complaints always think of themselves as diversity workers in the sense of trying to transform the institution in which the complaint is lodged. But in order to proceed with a complaint you often have to become a diversity worker because making a complaint within an institution brings you up against it. The lecture explores how we learn about the institutional (as usual) from those who are trying to transform institutions. The lecture will discuss how complaint is a sensational intervention into institutional life.

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